Understanding My Birth Control Options

Trying to pick the right form of birth control can sometimes feel a little overwhelming. Knowing what your needs are today, and having an idea of what they may be in the future, can help you narrow your options. 

At Florida Woman Care of Jacksonville in Jacksonville, Florida, our knowledgeable OB/GYNs — Daniel McDyer, MD, FACOG, and Julian Stephen Suhrer, MD — can help you pick the type of birth control that’s right for you. They’ve compiled this quiz and guide to help you narrow your choices.

Do you just need birth control once in a while?

If you’re not having sex regularly, you might benefit from short-term, at-will birth control. The types of birth control that you can carry with you and use only when you need them include:

Condoms are the only form of birth control (other than abstinence) that protects against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). You should use condoms whenever you’re not in a mutually monogamous relationship, no matter what other forms of contraception you also use.

Do you want something that’s low maintenance?

If you’d rather not tote birth control around with you, or if you have sex regularly, you might benefit from contraception that’s effective and easy to maintain. Choose from:

Hormonal birth control

Birth control pills were the first form of hormonal birth control, but you must remember to take them every day. New methods include implants such as Nexplanon® (more than 99% effective) which can remain in place for up to three years. A full listing of hormonal methods includes:

Intrauterine devices

Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are small flexible devices that your doctor fits into your cervix. The IUD prevents your uterus from creating a lining that could nourish a fertilized egg. Most IUDs also contain hormones that prevent eggs from being released in the first place.

One type of IUD is made from copper and doesn’t release hormones. Copper prevents sperm from being able to fertilize an egg. 

You can leave an IUD in place for up to 10 years. You won’t feel your IUD once it’s in place.

Even though hormones and IUDs offer long-term contraception, all are reversible methods. If you want to become pregnant, either stop taking your hormonal birth control or let us remove your IUD.

Do you want something permanent?

If you’re 100% certain that you don’t ever want to become pregnant, sterilization may be your best option. We offer tubal ligations, which is a surgery that severs and seals your fallopian tubes, so eggs can’t travel from your ovaries to your uterus. Tubal ligation isn’t reversible, so you must be sure you’ve finished or don’t want a biological family.

Your partner might also consider a vasectomy, which is a simpler operation. If so, we can refer him to a urologist.

Get the type of birth control you need by contacting the nearest Florida Woman Care of Jacksonville office by phone or online form.

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