Women's Health Care and COVID-19: What You Should Know

You’ve been following all of the advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Governor’s office: You wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds, maintain social distance when outside, and always wear a mask in public. But you’ve been having heavy periods, or you’re worried about a pregnancy, and you're afraid to go to the doctor’s office. Is it safe?

Caring OB/GYNs Daniel McDyer, MD, FACOG, and Julian Stephen Suhrer, MD, understand how confusing and frightening living through this pandemic has been. The rules are rewritten as more facts emerge. That’s why both of our two Florida Woman Care of Jacksonville offices in Jacksonville, Florida, are now open and equipped to handle the changing needs of patients during the pandemic while keeping you safe. 

Don’t delay your medical care

If you’re worried about yourself or your pregnancy, don’t let fears about the coronavirus keep you from getting the health care you need. Even before the pandemic, medical facilities had safety and disinfection protocols in place. We now keep you extra safe by scheduling appointments with enough time between patients so that you don’t have to wait in a crowded waiting room.

Our medical instruments are sterilized between uses, and many supplies are single-use only. If you’re in a high-risk group — such as having an autoimmune disease, underlying health conditions, or are over age 65 — please let us know when you phone the office so we can make appropriate arrangements for you.

If you’re suffering from fibroids or another non-emergency condition, the state of Florida has given the green light for elective surgeries. And, of course, if you have an emergency, our offices, as well as local emergency rooms, are equipped to take care of you safely.

Virtual visits and after-hours care

If you have an urgent medical problem or question about symptoms, and you’re currently a patient of ours, you may be able to get the answers you need through our Virtual Visits. Just follow the link and click on your preferred doctor to register for a Virtual Visit consultation. Dr. McDyer even provides after-hours virtual care.

For your Virtual Visit, you can use any device that has an internet connection, camera, and microphone, including a desktop computer, laptop, smartphone, or tablet. Use the Safari browser for Apple devices and Google Chrome for non-Apple devices. Be sure to read all of the instructions on our Virtual Visits page. You can also use a Virtual Visit or a simple phone call to get a renewal of your birth control or other prescription medication.

In case you can’t reach our doctors and you have an emergency, head to your nearest emergency room or to Labor and Delivery at Memorial Hospital (if you are more than 20 weeks pregnant) or to an urgent care center for evaluation.

Don’t neglect other aspects of your health because you’re afraid of COVID-19. Get the care you need by talking to our caring staff and deciding if you’d do best with a virtual or in-person visit. Contact the Florida Woman Care office nearest you by phone or online form.

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